Ox – Honest, sincere, and hard-working

Chinese ox sculpture

The feng shui ox ornament is a common feng shui item. Ox is one of the earliest domesticated livestock in the East, sacrificed and labored for the ordinary people, benefiting the world. Ox is related to people’s production, life, customs, and concepts and has been praised for a long time. Diligent work, auspiciousness, and safeness have become synonymous with the ox. Let’s take a look at the meaning of the cow ornament.

Symbol of hard work

The cow is a symbol of hard work in Chinese culture. In ancient times, people used cattle to pull plows for land preparation. Later, people knew that the cow’s strength was massive, and it began to have various applications, ranging from farming, transportation, and even military use.

Grazing cattles

Military use

During the Warring States Period, the State of Qi used the Fire Ox Array to defeat the State of Yan. During the Three Kingdoms period, the ox was also used in the plank road transportation of the Shu Kingdom in its crusade against the Wei Kingdom. In the Song Dynasty, it was illegal to slaughter cattle without permission. “Song History” once recorded that Bao Zheng, the magistrate of Tianchang County, tried a person who stole ox tongue and sued others for slaughtering ox without permission.

Fire ox array

China has been an agricultural culture since ancient times. Ox can help plow the fields naturally become good helpers for farmers. In addition to their hard-working habits, their meat can be excellent food that is available for consumption, ox is considered an auspicious beast in Fengshui study.

Ox in Chinese zodiac

Ranking the second in the Chinese zodiac, Ox or Cow is the symbol of diligence in Chinese culture. People under the sign of the Ox are usually hard working, honest, creative, ambitious, cautious, patient and handle things steadily. On the negative side, Ox people might be stubborn, narrow-minded, indifferent, prejudiced, slow and not good at communication.

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